Seminars and Colloquia Schedule

Monday, January 15, 2018 - 13:55 , Location: Skiles 006 , None , None , Organizer: Dan Margalit
Series: Other Talks
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 09:30 , Location: Skiles 005 , Several Speakers , Several affiliations. , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
This is a workshop designed to provide an introduction to the use of modern tools from Dynamical Systems in the design of space exploration missions.   More details and a detailed schedule is found in  http://people.math.gatech.edu/~rll6/JPL/jpl.html
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Ivan Corwin , Columbia University , ic2354@columbia.edu , Organizer: Michael Damron
The probability of outcomes of repeated fair coin tosses can be computed exactly using binomial coefficients. Performing asymptotics on these formulas uncovers the Gaussian distribution and the first instance of the central limit theorem. This talk will focus on higher version of this story. We will consider random motion subject to random forcing. By leveraging structures from representation theory and quantum integrable systems we can compute the analogs of binomial coefficients and extract new and different asymptotic behaviors than those of the Gaussian. This model and its analysis fall into the general theory of "integrable probability".
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Ying Zhu , Michigan State University , Organizer: Christian Houdre
Semiparametric regressions enjoy the flexibility of nonparametric models as well as the in-terpretability of linear models. These advantages can be further leveraged with recent ad-vance in high dimensional statistics. This talk begins with a simple partially linear model,Yi = Xi β ∗ + g ∗ (Zi ) + εi , where the parameter vector of interest, β ∗ , is high dimensional butsufficiently sparse, and g ∗ is an unknown nuisance function. In spite of its simple form, this highdimensional partially linear model plays a crucial role in counterfactual studies of heterogeneoustreatment effects. In the first half of this talk, I present an inference procedure for any sub-vector (regardless of its dimension) of the high dimensional β ∗ . This method does not requirethe “beta-min” condition and also works when the vector of covariates, Zi , is high dimensional,provided that the function classes E(Xij |Zi )s and E(Yi |Zi ) belong to exhibit certain sparsityfeatures, e.g., a sparse additive decomposition structure. In the second half of this talk, I discussthe connections between semiparametric modeling and Rubin’s Causal Framework, as well asthe applications of various methods (including the one from the first half of this talk and thosefrom my other papers) in counterfactual studies that are enriched by “big data”.Abstract as a .pdf
Series: Other Talks
Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Several Speakers , Several affiliations. , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
This is a workshop designed to provide an introduction to the use of modern tools from Dynamical Systems in the design of space exploration missions.   More details and a detailed schedule is found in  http://people.math.gatech.edu/~rll6/JPL/jpl.html
Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 13:55 , Location: Skiles 005 , Amalia Culiuc , Georgia Tech , amalia@math.gatech.edu , Organizer: Galyna Livshyts
An overarching problem in matrix weighted theory is the so-called A2 conjecture, namely the question of whether the norm of a Calderón-Zygmund operator acting on a matrix weighted L2 space depends linearly on the A2 characteristic of the weight. In this talk, I will discuss the history of this problem and provide a survey of recent results with an emphasis on the challenges that arise within the setup.
Series: Other Talks
Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 09:30 , Location: Skiles 005 , Several Speakers , Several affiliations. , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
This is a workshop designed to provide an introduction to the use of modern tools from Dynamical Systems in the design of space exploration missions.   More details and a detailed schedule is found in  http://people.math.gatech.edu/~rll6/JPL/jpl.html  
Series: Other Talks
Friday, January 19, 2018 - 09:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Several Speakers , Several affiliations. , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
This is a workshop designed to provide an introduction to the use of modern tools from Dynamical Systems in the design of space exploration missions.   More details and a detailed schedule is found in  http://people.math.gatech.edu/~rll6/JPL/jpl.html
Friday, January 19, 2018 - 13:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Sarah Cannon , CS, Georgia Tech , sarah.cannon@gatech.edu , Organizer: He Guo
Studying random samples drawn from large, complex sets is one way to begin to learn about typical properties and behaviors. However, it is important that the samples examined are random enough: studying samples that are unexpectedly correlated or drawn from the wrong distribution can produce misleading conclusions. Sampling processes using Markov chains have been utilized in physics, chemistry, and computer science, among other fields, but they are often applied without careful analysis of their reliability. Making sure widely-used sampling processes produce reliably representative samples is a main focus of my research, and in this talk I'll touch on two specific applications from statistical physics and combinatorics.I'll also discuss work applying these same  Markov chain processes used for sampling in a novel way to address research questions in programmable matter and swarm robotics, where a main goal is to understand how simple computational elements can accomplish  complicated system-level goals. In a constrained setting, we've answered this question by showing that groups of abstract particles executing our simple processes (which are derived from Markov chains) can provably accomplish remarkable global objectives. In the long run, one goal is to understand the minimum computational abilities elements need in order to exhibit complex global behavior, with an eye towards developing systems where individual components are  as simple as possible.This talk includes joint work with Marta Andrés Arroyo, Joshua J. Daymude, Daniel I. Goldman, David A. Levin, Shengkai Li, Dana Randall, Andréa Richa, William Savoie, Alexandre Stauffer, and Ross Warkentin.