Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Klaus 2447 , Various Speaker , Different units of GT , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
The workshop will launch the thematic semesters on Dynamics (Fall 2017) and Control (Spring 2018) for GT-MAP activities.  This is a two-day workshop, the first day focusing on the theme of Dynamics, and the second day focusing on the theme of Control. There will be light refreshments throughout the event. The workshop will be held in the Klaus building Room 2447. More information at http://gtmap.gatech.edu/events/gt-map-workshop-dynamics-and-control
Monday, August 14, 2017 - 14:11 , Location: Skiles 006 , Albert Fathi , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Dan Margalit
We will give different topological very simple statements that seem not to have been noticed, although they are of the level of Brouwer’s fixed point theorem. The main result is: Let F be a compact subset of the manifold M. Assume g:F->M is a continuous map which is the identity on the boundary (or frontier) of F, then the image g(F) contains either F or M\F.
Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 10:54 , Location: Klaus 1447 , Various Speakers , From various places , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
GT MAP sponsored "Workshop on Dynamical Systems" to mark the retirement of Prof. Shui Nee Chow.  Full day August 10- 11. After nearly 30 years at Georgia Tech, Prof. Shui Nee Chow has officially retired.  This workshop will see several of his former students, post-docs, and friends, coming together to thank Shui Nee for his vision, service, and research, that so greatly impacted the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech. The workshop will be held in the Klaus building Room 1447. More information at http://gtmap.gatech.edu/events/workshop-dynamical-system
Monday, August 7, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles Conference Room 114 , Ingrid Irmer , University of Melbourne , Organizer: Stavros Garoufalidis
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Series: Other Talks
Monday, July 31, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Clough 152 (plenary talks), Skiles (parallel sessions) , SIAM AG 2017 , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Anton Leykin
Georgia Tech is the site of the 2017 SIAM Conference on Applied Algebraic Geometry (July 31 to August 4). This biennial meeting is an activity of the Activity Group in Applied Geometry of SIAM, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The SIAM Activity Group in Algebraic Geometry aims to bring together researchers who use algebraic geometry in industrial and applied mathematics. "Algebraic geometry" is interpreted broadly to include at least algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, noncommutative algebra, symbolic and numeric computation, algebraic and geometric combinatorics, representation theory, and algebraic topology. These methods have already seen applications in biology, coding theory, cryptography, combustion, computational geometry, computer graphics, quantum computing, control theory, geometric design, complexity theory, machine learning, nonlinear partial differential equations, optimization, robotics, and statistics. School of Mathematics professors Greg Blekherman, Anton Leykin, and Josephine Yu lead the local organizing committee. 
Series: Other Talks
Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Skiles 005 and 006 , Macaulay2 , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Anton Leykin
Dates: July 27-29 (Thu-Sat). Schedule will appear here. These tutorials are intended to appeal to participants with any level of prior M2 experience. The topics will range from the basic functionality of M2 to modeling problems in the M2 language to more specialized tutorials on algebraic statistics and numerical algebraic geometry. We will also reserve ample time for practice and Q&A sessions. Registration is free, but please fill the form here.
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Albert Granados , Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
When perturbed with a small periodic forcing, two (or more)  coupledconservative oscillators can exhibit instabilities: trajectories thatbecome unstable while accumulating ``unbounded'' energy from thesource.  This is known as Arnold diffusion, and has been traditionallyapplied to celestial mechanics, for example to study the stability ofthe solar system or to explain the Kirkwood gaps in the asteroid belt.However, such phenomenon could be extremely useful in energyharvesting systems as well, whose aim is precisely to capture as muchenergy as possible from a source.In this talk we will show a first step towards the application ofArnold diffusion theory in energy harvesting systems. We will consideran energy harvesting system based on two piezoelectric oscillators.When forced to oscillate, for instance when driven by a small periodicvibration, such oscillators create an electrical current which chargesan accumulator (a capacitor or a battery). Unfortunately, suchoscillators are not conservative, as they are not perfectly elastic(they exhibit damping).We will discuss the persistence of normally hyperbolic invariantmanifolds, which play a crucial role in the diffusing mechanisms. Bymeans of the parameterization method, we will compute such manifoldsand their associated stable and unstable manifolds. We will alsodiscuss the Melnikov method to obtain sufficient conditions for theexistence of homoclinic intersections.
Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 14:16 , Location: None , None , None , Organizer: Dan Margalit
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 16:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Ishwari Kunwar , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Michael Lacey
In this thesis, we introduce multilinear dyadic paraproducts and Haar multipliers, and discuss boundedness properties of these operators and their commutators with locally integrable functions in various settings. We also present pointwise domination of these operators by multilinear sparse operators, which we use to prove multilinear Bloom’s inequality for the commutators of multilinear Haar multipliers. Along the way, we provide several characterizations of dyadic BMO functions. 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 10:30 , Location: Skiles 006 , Nick Vlamis , Michigan , Organizer: Justin Lanier
There has been a recent interest in studying surfaces of infinite type, i.e. surfaces with infinitely-generated fundamental groups. In this talk, we will focus on their mapping class groups, often called big mapping class groups. In contrast to the finite-type case, there are many open questions regarding the basic algebraic and topological properties of big mapping class groups. I will discuss several such questions and provide some answers. In particular, I will discuss automorphism groups of mapping class groups as well as relations between topological invariants of a surface and algebraic invariants of its mapping class group.  The results in the talk are based on recent joint work with Priyam Patel and ongoing joint work with Javier Aramayona and Priyam Patel.

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