Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Elliot Paquette , The Ohio State University , , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
We study an online algorithm for making a well—equidistributed random set of points in an interval, in the spirit of "power of choice" methods. Suppose finitely many distinct points are placed on an interval in any arbitrary configuration. This configuration of points subdivides the circle into a finite number of intervals. At each time step, two points are sampled uniformly from the interval. Each of these points lands within some pair of intervals formed by the previous configuration. Add the point that falls in the larger interval to the existing configuration of points, discard the other, and then repeat this process. We then study this point configuration in the sense of its largest interval, and discuss other "power of choice" type modifications. Joint work with Pascal Maillard.
Friday, November 3, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Joel Spencer , Courant Institute, New York University , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
The search for the asymptotics of the Ramsey function R(3,k) has a long and fascinating history. It begins in the hill country surrounding Budapest and winding over the decades through Europe, America, Korea and Rio de Janiero. We explore it through a CS lens, giving algorithms that provide the various upper and lower bounds. The arguments are various more or less sophisticated uses of Erdos Magic and, indeed, many of the most important advances in the Probabilistic Method have come from these investigations.
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Megan Bernstein , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
Cutoff is a remarkable property of many Markov chains in which they rapidly transition from an unmixed to a mixed distribution. Most random walks on the symmetric group, also known as card shuffles, are believed to mix with cutoff, but we are far from being able to proof this. We will survey existing cutoff results and techniques for random walks on the symmetric group, and present three recent results: cutoff for a biased transposition walk, cutoff for the random-to-random card shuffle (answering a 2001 conjecture of Diaconis), and pre-cutoff for the involution walk, generated by permutations with a binomially distributed number of two-cycles. The results use either probabilistic techniques such as strong stationary times or diagonalization through algebraic combinatorics and representation theory of the symmetric group. Includes joint work with Nayantara Bhatnagar, Evita Nestoridi, and Igor Pak.
Friday, October 20, 2017 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Mike Molloy , University of Toronto , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
We prove that every triangle-free graph with maximum degree $D$ has list chromatic number at most $(1+o(1))\frac{D}{\ln D}$. This matches the best-known bound for graphs of girth at least 5.  We also provide a new proof  that for any $r \geq 4$ every $K_r$-free graph has list-chromatic number at most $200r\frac{D\ln\ln D}{\ln D}$. 
Friday, October 13, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Heather Smith , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
The original notion of poset dimension is due to Dushnik and Miller (1941). Last year, Uerckerdt (2016) proposed a variant, called local dimension, which has garnered considerable interest. A local realizer of a poset P is a collection of partial linear extensions of P that cover the comparabilities and incomparabilities of P. The local dimension of P is the minimum frequency of a local realizer where frequency is the maximum multiplicity of an element of P. Hiraguchi (1955) proved that any poset with n points has dimension at most n/2, which is sharp. We prove that the local dimension of a poset with n points is O(n/log n). To show that this bound is best possible, we use probabilistic methods to prove the following stronger result which extends a theorem of Chung, Erdős, and Spencer (1983): There is an n-vertex bipartite graph in which each difference graph cover of the edges will cover one of the vertices Θ(n/log n) times. (This is joint work with Jinha Kim, Ryan R. Martin, Tomáš Masařı́k, Warren Shull, Andrew Uzzell, and Zhiyu Wang)
Friday, October 6, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Matas Sileikis , Charles University Prague , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
Given a (fixed) graph H, let X be the number of copies of H in the random binomial graph G(n,p). In this talk we recall the results on the asymptotic behaviour of X, as the number n of vertices grows and pis allowed to depend on. In particular we will focus on the problem of estimating probability that X is significantly larger than its expectation, which earned the name of the 'infamous upper tail'.
Friday, September 29, 2017 - 14:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , none , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
No Combinatorics Seminar, but many others of interest: (a) on Friday [September 29th, 1pm-2pm in Skiles 005] He Guo, will give an ACO Student Seminar on "Packing nearly optimal Ramsey R(3,t) Graphs" (b) on Thursday [September 28th, 11am-12am in Skiles 006] Tom Bohman will give an ACO colloquim talk on "Randomized Controlled Trials for Combinatorial Construction" (c) on Saturday and Sunday [September 30th and October 1st] Atlanta Lecture Series in Combinatorics and Graph Theory XX takes place at Georgia Tech, with featured speaker Paul Seymour
Friday, September 22, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: - , - , - , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
Clash with "The IDEaS Seminar Series": the talk of Ravi Kannan at 3pm on "Topic Modeling: Proof to Practice" might of interest (Location: TSRB Auditorium) --  Topic Modeling is used in a variety of contexts. This talk will outline from first principles the problem, and the well-known Latent Dirichlet Al-location (LDA) model before moving to the main focus of the talk: Recent algorithms to solve the model-learning problem with provable worst-case error and time guarantees. We present a new algorithm which enjoys both provable guarantees as well performance to scale on corpora with billions of words on a single box. Besides corpus size, a second challenge is the growth in the number of topics. We address this with a new model in which topics lie on low-dimensional faces of the topic simplex rather than just vertices.
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Tom Trotter , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
The original concept ofdimension for posets was formulatedby Dushnik and Miller in 1941 and hasbeen studied extensively in the literature.Over the years, a number of variant formsof dimension have been proposed withvarying degrees of interest and application.However, in the recent past, two variantshave received extensive attention.  Theyare Boolean dimension and local dimension.This is the first of two talks on these twoconcepts, with the second talk givenby Heather Smith.  In this talk, wewill introduce the two parameters and providemotivation for their study.  We will alsogive some concrete examples andprove some basic inequalities.This is joint work with a GeorgiaTech team in which my colleaguesare Fidel Barrera-Cruz, Tom Prag,Heather Smith and Libby Taylor.
Friday, September 8, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Laura Eslava , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
Among the most studied tree growth processes there are recursive trees and linear preferential attachment trees. The study of these two models is motivated by the need of understanding the evolution of social networks. A key feature of social networks is the presence of vertices that serve as hubs, connecting large parts of the network. While such type of vertices had been widely studied for linear preferential attachment trees, analogous results for recursive trees were missing. In this talk, we will present joint laws for both the number and depth of vertices with near-maximal degrees and comment on the possibilities that our methods open for future research. This is joint work with Louigi Addario-Berry.