Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Frontiers in Science - Bionic Knees and Elephant Nerves

Series
Other Talks
Time
Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 19:00 for 2 hours
Location
Clary Theatre
Speaker
Max DonelanSimon Fraser University, Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology

Please Note: 
After the talk there will be a reception and time for visitors to chat with Donelan and each other.

Professor Max Donelan talks about the bionic energy harvester, which uses energy generated from walking to power portable devices. He also discusses his research on the reflexes and nerves of animals, from elephants to shrews.

Atlanta Lecture Series in Combinatorics and Graph Theory XIII

Series
Other Talks
Time
Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 13:00 for 4 hours (half day)
Location
Emory University
Speaker
Peter KeevashOxford University
Emory University, Georgia Tech and Georgia State University, with support from the National Science Foundation and the National Security Agency, will continue the series of mini-conferences and host a series of 9 new mini-conferences from 2014-2017. The 13th of these mini-conferences will be held at Emory University during November 1-2, 2014. The conferences will stress a variety of areas and feature one prominent researcher giving 2 fifty minute lectures and 4 outstanding researchers each giving one fifty minute lecture. There will also be several 25 minute lecturers by younger researchers or graduate students. For more details, see the schedule

Homecoming 2014

Series
Other Talks
Time
Friday, October 31, 2014 - 16:00 for 5 hours
Location
North end of Tech Green
Speaker
HomecomingSchools in the College of Sciences
This year's homecoming activities promise to be better than ever with all of the schools in the College of Sciences getting together to throw one big bash. Hear the CoS All-Star band, play casino and table games and take part in our photo contest. Come early to take a tour of science labs and hear faculty and students show-off their research. This is Halloween, so wear your costume to take part in the 2014 All Hallow's Eve Costume contest, if you wish. Come as your favorite costume, extra points for including some science in your get-up. There will be fabulous prizes, giveways and much, much more! Families, kids and guests are welcome. Those without an RSVP will still be able to purchase food, but for free food RSVP is required.

What does it mean to be intelligent?

Series
Other Talks
Time
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 19:00 for 2 hours
Location
Clary Theater
Speaker
Randy EngleSchool of Psychology, Georgia Tech

Please Note: After the lecture, there will be a reception and time to chat with Engle and other guests.

During the next Frontiers in Science lecture, Randy Engle, professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Psychology, will talk about how the cultural and biological aspects of human intelligence differ from each other, and even change over a lifetime. Engle will discuss how biologically based intelligence is involved in our ability to pay attention and resist distractions. He’ll also discuss how socio-economic status plays a role. He’ll uncover some of the brain mechanisms and genetics involved, and talk about recent attempts, by such companies as Lumosity, to help people improve their fluid intelligence.

Southeast Geometry Seminar XXV

Series
Other Talks
Time
Sunday, October 26, 2014 - 08:30 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
University of Tennessee Knoxville
Speaker
Southeast Geometry SeminarUniversity of Tennessee Knoxville
The Southeast Geometry Seminar is a series of semiannual one-day events focusing on geometric analysis. These events are hosted in rotation by the following institutions: Emory University; Georgia Institute of Technology; University of Alabama at Birmingham; University of Tennessee Knoxville. The following five speakers will give presentations: Sigurd Angenent (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Omer Bobrowski (Duke University); Tom Ivey (College of Charleston); Ken Knox (University of Tennessee); Facundo Memoli (Ohio State University). Please email oliker@mathcs.emory.edu if you plan to attend and wish to request support.

ARC Colloquium - The Knuth Prize Lecture: The Stories Behind the Results

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Klaus 1116
Speaker
Dick LiptonSchool of Computer Science, Georgia Tech

Please Note: Hosted by Dana Randall

I will present a number of stories about some results that I think highlight how results get proved and how they do not. These will span problems from almost all areas of theory, and will include both successes and failures. I hope that beyond the actual results you will enjoy and hopefully profit from the stories.

Physics Colloquium - Hydrodynamics and Quantum Anomalies

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, September 15, 2014 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Pettit Bldg., Conf Room 102 A&B
Speaker
Dam Thanh SonUniversity of Chicago

Please Note: Host: Shina Tan, School of Physics, Georgia Tech

Hydrodynamics is the theory describing collective behaviors of fluids and gases. It has a very long history and is usually considered to belong to the realm of classical physics. In recent years, it has been found that, in many cases, hydrodynamics can manifest a purely quantum effect --- anomalies. We will see how this new appreciation of the interplay between quantum and classical physics has emerged, unexpectedly, through the idea of gauge/gravity duality, which originates in modern string theory. I will briefly mention the possible relevance of the new findings to the physics of the quark gluon plasma.

Atlanta Lecture Series in Combinatorics and Graph Theory XII

Series
Other Talks
Time
Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 13:00 for 5 hours
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Bruce ReedMcGill University
Emory University, Georgia Tech and Georgia State University, with support from the National Science Foundation and the National Security Agency, will continue the series of mini-conferences and host a series of 9 new mini-conferences from 2014-2017. The 12th of these mini-conferences will be held at Georgia Tech during April 26-27, 2014. The conferences will stress a variety of areas and feature one prominent researcher giving 2 fifty minute lectures and 4 outstanding researchers each giving one fifty minute lecture. There will also be several 25 minute lecturers by younger researchers or graduate students. For more details, see the schedule

ARC Theory Day

Series
Other Talks
Time
Friday, April 25, 2014 - 09:00 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Klaus 1116E
Speaker
ARC Theory DayAlgorithms and Randomness Center, Georgia Tech
Algorithms and Randomness Center (ARC) Theory Day is an annual event that features hour-long lectures focusing on recent innovative results in theoretical computer science, spanning a wide array of topics several of which are inspired by practical problems. See the complete list of titles and times of talks.

A two-scale proof of the Eyring-Kramers formula

Series
Other Talks
Time
Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 11:05 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Georg MenzStanford University
We consider a diffusion on a potential landscape which is given by a smooth Hamiltonian in the regime of small noise. We give a new proof of the Eyring-Kramers formula for the spectral gap of the associated generator of the diffusion. The proof is based on a refinement of the two-scale approach introduced by Grunewald, Otto, Villani, and Westdickenberg and of the mean-difference estimate introduced by Chafai and Malrieu. The Eyring-Kramers formula follows as a simple corollary from two main ingredients : The first one shows that the Gibbs measure restricted to a domain of attraction has a "good" Poincaré constant mimicking the fast convergence of the diffusion to metastable states. The second ingredient is the estimation of the mean-difference by a new weighted transportation distance. It contains the main contribution of the spectral gap, resulting from exponential long waiting times of jumps between metastable states of the diffusion. This new approach also allows to derive sharp estimates on the log-Sobolev constant. This is joint work with Andre Schlichting.

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