Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Friday, March 30, 2018 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles , Chethan Pandarinath , GT BME , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
TBA
Friday, March 9, 2018 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Evangelos Theodorou , GT AE , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
TBA
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 14:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Bunimovich, Fathi, Grigoriev, de la Llave and Zeng , GT Math and Physics , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
Friday, November 10, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Prof. Fumin Zhang , GT ECE , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
There is an increasing trend for robots to serve as networked mobile sensing platforms that are able to collect data and interact with humans in various types of environment in unprecedented ways.  The need for undisturbed operation posts higher goals for autonomy. This talk reviews recent developments in autonomous collective foraging in a complex environment that explicitly integrates insights from biology with models and provable strategies from control theory and robotics. The methods are rigorously developed and tightly integrated with experimental effort with promising results achieved.
Friday, October 20, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Prof. Martin Short , GT Math , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
Data assimilation is a powerful tool for combining mathematical models with real-world data to make better predictions and estimate the state and/or parameters of dynamical systems. In this talk I will give an overview of some work on models for predicting urban crime patterns, ranging from stochastic models to differential equations. I will then present some work on data assimilation techniques that have been developed and applied for this problem, so that these models can be joined with real data for purposes of model fitting and crime forecasting.  
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Klaus 2447 , Various Speaker , Different units of GT , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
The workshop will launch the thematic semesters on Dynamics (Fall 2017) and Control (Spring 2018) for GT-MAP activities.  This is a two-day workshop, the first day focusing on the theme of Dynamics, and the second day focusing on the theme of Control. There will be light refreshments throughout the event. The workshop will be held in the Klaus building Room 2447. More information at http://gtmap.gatech.edu/events/gt-map-workshop-dynamics-and-control
Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 10:54 , Location: Klaus 1447 , Various Speakers , From various places , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
GT MAP sponsored "Workshop on Dynamical Systems" to mark the retirement of Prof. Shui Nee Chow.  Full day August 10- 11. After nearly 30 years at Georgia Tech, Prof. Shui Nee Chow has officially retired.  This workshop will see several of his former students, post-docs, and friends, coming together to thank Shui Nee for his vision, service, and research, that so greatly impacted the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech. The workshop will be held in the Klaus building Room 1447. More information at http://gtmap.gatech.edu/events/workshop-dynamical-system
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 10:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Speaker list and schedule can be found at http://www.math.gatech.edu/hg/item/589661 , Organizers: Shui-Nee Chow, Wilfrid Gangbo, Prasad Tetali, and Haomin Zhou , Organizer: Haomin Zhou

This workshop is sponsored by College of Science, School of Mathematics, GT-MAP and NSF. 

The goal of this workshop is to bring together experts in various aspects of optimal transport and related topics on graphs (e.g., PDE/Numerics, Computational and Analytic/Probabilistic aspects).  
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 16:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Alexander H. Chang , GT ECE , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
Robotic snakes have the potential to navigate areas or environments that would be more challenging for traditionally engineered robots. To realize their potential requires deriving feedback control and path planning algorithms applicable to the diverse gait modalities possible. In turn, this requires equations of motion for snake movement that generalize across the gait types and their interaction dynamics. This talk will discuss efforts towards both obtaining general control equations for snake robots, and controlling them along planned trajectories. We model three-dimensional time- and spatially-varying locomotion gaits, utilized by snake-like robots, as planar continuous body curves. In so doing, quantities relevant to computing system dynamics are expressed conveniently and geometrically with respect to the planar body, thereby facilitating derivation of governing equations of motion. Simulations using the derived dynamics characterize the averaged, steady-behavior as a function of the gait parameters. These then inform an optimal trajectory planner tasked to generate viable paths through obstacle-strewn terrain. Discrete-time feedback control successfully guides the snake-like robot along the planned paths.
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Patricio A. Vela , GT ECE , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
Robotic locomotive mechanisms designed to mimic those of their biological counterparts differ from traditionally engineered systems. Though both require overcoming non-holonomic properties of the interaction dynamics, the nature of their non-holonomy differs.  Traditionally engineered systems have more direct actuation, in the sense that control signals directly lead to generated forces or torques, as in the case of rotors, wheels, motors, jets/ducted fans, etc. In contrast, the body/environment interactions that animals exploit induce forces  or torque that may not always align with their intended direction vector.Through periodic shape change animals are able to effect an overall force or torque in the desired direction. Deriving control equations for this class of robotic systems requires modelling the periodic interaction forces, then  applying averaging theory to arrive at autonomous nonlinear control models whose form and structure resembles that of traditionally engineered systems. Once obtained, classical nonlinear control methods may be applied, though some  attention is required since the control can no longer apply at arbitrary  time scales.The talk will cover the fundamentals of averaging theory and efforts to identify a generalized averaging strategy capable of recovering the desired control equations. Importantly, the strategy reverses the typical approach to averaged expansions, which significantly simplifies the procedure. Doing so  provides insights into feedback control strategies available for systems controlled through time-periodic signals.

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