Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Tim Austin , UCLA Mathematics Department , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Santosh Vempala , Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Computing, ISYE, Math , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
Friday, March 2, 2018 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Jill Pipher , Brown University , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
The regularity properties of solutions to linear partial differential equations in domains depend on the structure of the equation, the degree of smoothness of the coefficients of the equation, and of the boundary of the domain. Quantifying this dependence is a classical problem, and modern techniques can answer some of these questions with remarkable precision. For both physical and theoretical reasons, it is important to consider partial differential equations with non-smooth coefficients. We’ll discuss how some classical tools in harmonic and complex analysis have played a central role in answering questions in this subject at the interface of harmonic analysis and PDE.
Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Robert Hough , Stony Brook University , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
A distinct covering system of congruences is a finite collection of arithmetic progressions $$a_i \bmod m_i, \qquad 1 < m_1 < m_2 < \cdots < m_k.$$Erdős asked whether the least modulus of a distinct covering system of congruences can be arbitrarily large.  I will discuss my proof that minimum modulus is at most $10^{16}$, and recent joint work with Pace Nielsen, in which it is proven that every distinct covering system of congruences has a modulus divisible by either 2 or 3.
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Leonid Bunimovich , GT , bunimovh@math.gatech.edu , Organizer:
Evolution of random systems as well as dynamical systems with chaotic (stochastic) behavior traditionally (and seemingly naturally) is described by studying only asymptotic in time (when time tends to infinity) their properties. The corresponding results are formulated in the form of various limit theorems (CLT, large deviations, etc). Likewise basically all the main notions (entropy, Lyapunov exponents, etc) involve either taking limit when time goes to infinity or averaging over an infinite time interval. Recently a series of results was obtained demonstrating that finite time predictions for such systems are possible. So far the results are on the intersection of dynamical systems, probability and combinatorics. However, this area suggests some new analytical, statistical and geometric problems to name a few, as well as opens up possibility to obtain new types of results in various applications. I will describe the results on (extremely) simple examples which will make this talk  quite accessible.
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Ivan Corwin , Columbia University , ic2354@columbia.edu , Organizer: Michael Damron
The probability of outcomes of repeated fair coin tosses can be computed exactly using binomial coefficients. Performing asymptotics on these formulas uncovers the Gaussian distribution and the first instance of the central limit theorem. This talk will focus on higher version of this story. We will consider random motion subject to random forcing. By leveraging structures from representation theory and quantum integrable systems we can compute the analogs of binomial coefficients and extract new and different asymptotic behaviors than those of the Gaussian. This model and its analysis fall into the general theory of "integrable probability".
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 16:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Emmy Murphy , Northwestern University , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
Associated to a planar cubic graph, there is a closed surface in R^5, as defined by Treumann and Zaslow. R^5 has a canonical geometry, called a contact structure, which is compatible with the surface. The data of how this surface interacts with the geometry recovers interesting data about the graph, notably its chromatic polynomial. This also connects with pseudo-holomorphic curve counts which have boundary on the surface, and by looking at the resulting differential graded algebra coming from symplectic field theory, we obtain new definitions of n-colorings which are strongly non-linear as compared to other known definitions. There are also relationships with SL_2 gauge theory, mathematical physics, symplectic flexibility, and holomorphic contact geometry. During the talk we'll explain the basic ideas behind the various fields above, and why these various concepts connect.
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Joel Spencer , Courant Institute, New York University , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
Traditional Erdos Magic (a.k.a. The Probabilistic Method) proves the existence of an object with certain properties by showing that a random (appropriately defined) object will have those properties with positive probability. Modern Erdos Magic analyzes a random process, a random (CS take note!) algorithm. These, when successful, can find a "needle in an exponential haystack" in polynomial time. We'll look at two particular examples, both involving a family of n-element sets under suitable side conditions. The Lovasz Local Lemma finds a coloring with no set monochromatic. A result of this speaker finds a coloring with low discrepency. In both cases the original proofs were not implementable but Modern Erdos Magic finds the colorings in polynomial times. The methods are varied. Basic probability and combinatorics. Brownian Motion. Semigroups. Martingales. Recursions ... and Tetris!
Thursday, October 5, 2017 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Yuri Kifer , Hebrew University , Organizer:
Thursday, October 5, 2017 - 11:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Yuri Kifer , Hebrew University of Jerusalem , Organizer: Mayya Zhilova
The study of nonconventional sums $S_{N}=\sum_{n=1}^{N}F(X(n),X(2n),\dots,X(\ell n))$, where $X(n)=g \circ T^n$ for a measure preserving transformation $T$, has a 40 years history after Furstenberg showed that they are related to the ergodic theory proof of Szemeredi's theorem about arithmetic progressions in the sets of integers of positive density. Recently, it turned out that various limit theorems of probabilty theory can be successfully studied for sums $S_{N}$ when $X(n), n=1,2,\dots$ are weakly dependent random variables. I will talk about a more general situation of nonconventional arrays of the form $S_{N}=\sum_{n=1}^{N}F(X(p_{1}n+q_{1}N),X(p_{2}n+q_{2}N),\dots,X(p_{\ell}n+q_{\ell}N))$ and how this is related to an extended version of Szemeredi's theorem. I'll discuss also ergodic and limit theorems for such and more general nonconventional arrays.

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