Xingjie Yan

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April 17, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Every year, Georgia Tech welcomes students who compete at the Georgia Tech High School Math Competition. Accompanied by teachers, coaches, and parents, the participants represent high schools from around Georgia and nearby states. Around 40 volunteers from among the Georgia Tech faculty, staff and students helped with registration, proctoring, and grading.

Thanks to the hard work of everyone involved, the High School Mathematics competition was a huge success. In 2018, over 250 students from 37 high schools competed in this annual Georgia Tech tradition, dating back to 1958. This year, the 2019 competition challenged over 300 students from 43 high schools to complete the competition’s four exams in such topics as algebra, geometry, combinatorics, number theory, and basic calculus.

The top 59 students from the free response exam were invited to take part in a proofs exam during the afternoon in order to determine the individual winners.

Team Rank

1rst Place: Walton High School Team A

2nd Place: Fulton Science Academy Team A

3rd Place: Chamblee Charter High School Team A, Northview High School Team A (TIE)

5th Place: Asheville Homeschool Team A, South Forsyth High School Team A (TIE)

Individual Winners

1rst Place: Holden Watson (Fulton Science Academy Private School)

2nd Place: Russell Emerine (Walton High School)

3rd Place: Darren Key (Walton High School)

April 17, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Every year, Georgia Tech welcomes students who compete at the Georgia Tech High School Math Competition. Accompanied by teachers, coaches, and parents, the participants represent high schools from around Georgia and nearby states. Around 40 volunteers from among the Georgia Tech faculty, staff and students helped with registration, proctoring, and grading.

Thanks to the hard work of everyone involved, the High School Mathematics competition was a huge success. In 2018, over 250 students from 37 high schools competed in this annual Georgia Tech tradition, dating back to 1958. This year, the 2019 competition challenged over 300 students from 43 high schools to complete the competition’s four exams in such topics as algebra, geometry, combinatorics, number theory, and basic calculus.

The top 59 students from the free response exam were invited to take part in a proofs exam during the afternoon in order to determine the individual winners.

Team Rank

1rst Place: Walton High School Team A

2nd Place: Fulton Science Academy Team A

3rd Place: Chamblee Charter High School Team A, Northview High School Team A (TIE)

5th Place: Asheville Homeschool Team A, South Forsyth High School Team A (TIE)

Individual Winners

1rst Place: Holden Watson (Fulton Science Academy Private School)

2nd Place: Russell Emerine (Walton High School)

3rd Place: Darren Key (Walton High School)

April 17, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Two SoM graduate students, Sarah (Sally) Collins and Michael Wigal, have been awarded the prestigious NSF GRFP (National Science Foundation Graduate Reasearch Fellowship Program) fellowships. 

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions. 

The fellowship offers a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance, opportunities for international research and professional development, as well as the prestige from winning one of the most competitive fellowships one can get in the sciences. 

Sally and Michael are two of the only three Georgia Tech College of Science graduate students to recieve an NSF GRFP fellowship this year. 

Sarah (Sally) Collins is a second year PhD student who recieved her B.A. in Mathematics from Boston College in 2015. Sally studies low-dimensional topology and geometry with a special interest in Khovanov homology and braided surfaces.

Michael Wigal is a first year student in the ACO (Algorithms, Combinatorics, and Optimization) program working with Professor Xingxing Yu. Michael's research interests lie in graph theory and partial orders.

Previous NSF GRFP fellowships at SoM:

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

  • 2011 Sarah Fletcher
  • 2015 Anna Kirkpatrick & Joseph Walsh
  • 2016 Justin Lanier & Samantha Petti
  • 2019 Sarah Collins & Michael Wigal

April 17, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Two SoM graduate students, Sarah (Sally) Collins and Michael Wigal, have been awarded the prestigious NSF GRFP (National Science Foundation Graduate Reasearch Fellowship Program) fellowships. 

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions. 

The fellowship offers a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance, opportunities for international research and professional development, as well as the prestige from winning one of the most competitive fellowships one can get in the sciences. 

Sally and Michael are two of the only three Georgia Tech College of Science graduate students to recieve an NSF GRFP fellowship this year. 

Sarah (Sally) Collins is a second year PhD student who recieved her B.A. in Mathematics from Boston College in 2015. Sally studies low-dimensional topology and geometry with a special interest in Khovanov homology and braided surfaces.

Michael Wigal is a first year student in the ACO (Algorithms, Combinatorics, and Optimization) program working with Professor Xingxing Yu. Michael's research interests lie in graph theory and partial orders.

Previous NSF GRFP fellowships at SoM:

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

  • 2011 Sarah Fletcher
  • 2015 Anna Kirkpatrick & Joseph Walsh
  • 2016 Justin Lanier & Samantha Petti
  • 2019 Sarah Collins & Michael Wigal

April 18, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Georgia Tech has selected Plamen Iliev as a recipient of the 2019 Geoffrey G. Eichholz Faculty Teaching Award, administered by the Center for Teaching and Learning. A professor in the School of Mathematics, Iliev has taught mathematics courses at all levels, from large lecture service courses to core graduate courses.

The award recognizes faculty who provide outstanding teaching to students in core and general undergraduate courses and help students establish a solid foundation for their education at Georgia Tech. Colleagues say he cares about his students, has high expectations of them, and is an effective and engaging teacher.

Among the large lecture classes Iliev has taught are Calculus I, II, and III; Differential Equations; and Multivariable Calculus.

In addition, he has taught Abstract Vector Spaces, Applied Combinatorics, Probability and Statistics, Real Analysis I and II, Complex Analysis, and Classical Mathematical Methods in Engineering.

“An amazing lecturer. Comes to class with no notes and somehow delivers extremely relevant examples. I always leave class with a clear understanding of what I just learned.

Whatever the subject, accolades from students are profuse about Iliev’s effectiveness as a teacher:

“Best math teacher I’ve ever had....Ten thumbs up!”

“If I could have him for as a teacher for all my courses, it would be great.”

“He always made his expectations very clear and always announced what he planned to teach us next. He cared very much whether or not students learned material.”

“He is very approachable and welcoming.”

“He knows his stuff backwards and forward.”

“He was very funny and kind and made the class interesting. He communicated well with students.”

“An amazing lecturer. Comes to class with no notes and somehow delivers extremely relevant examples. I always leave class with a clear understanding of what I just learned.”

Since joining Georgia Tech in 2003, Iliev has taught more than 3,000 students. His effective teaching has made a broad impact on undergraduate education and has provided solid foundational training for graduate students.

“It has been a privilege to teach at Georgia Tech for the past 16 years,” Iliev says. “We are fortunate to have very bright and hardworking students, which makes teaching every class an enjoyable and rewarding experience.”

April 18, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

Georgia Tech has selected Plamen Iliev as a recipient of the 2019 Geoffrey G. Eichholz Faculty Teaching Award, administered by the Center for Teaching and Learning. A professor in the School of Mathematics, Iliev has taught mathematics courses at all levels, from large lecture service courses to core graduate courses.

The award recognizes faculty who provide outstanding teaching to students in core and general undergraduate courses and help students establish a solid foundation for their education at Georgia Tech. Colleagues say he cares about his students, has high expectations of them, and is an effective and engaging teacher.

Among the large lecture classes Iliev has taught are Calculus I, II, and III; Differential Equations; and Multivariable Calculus.

In addition, he has taught Abstract Vector Spaces, Applied Combinatorics, Probability and Statistics, Real Analysis I and II, Complex Analysis, and Classical Mathematical Methods in Engineering.

“An amazing lecturer. Comes to class with no notes and somehow delivers extremely relevant examples. I always leave class with a clear understanding of what I just learned.

Whatever the subject, accolades from students are profuse about Iliev’s effectiveness as a teacher:

“Best math teacher I’ve ever had....Ten thumbs up!”

“If I could have him for as a teacher for all my courses, it would be great.”

“He always made his expectations very clear and always announced what he planned to teach us next. He cared very much whether or not students learned material.”

“He is very approachable and welcoming.”

“He knows his stuff backwards and forward.”

“He was very funny and kind and made the class interesting. He communicated well with students.”

“An amazing lecturer. Comes to class with no notes and somehow delivers extremely relevant examples. I always leave class with a clear understanding of what I just learned.”

Since joining Georgia Tech in 2003, Iliev has taught more than 3,000 students. His effective teaching has made a broad impact on undergraduate education and has provided solid foundational training for graduate students.

“It has been a privilege to teach at Georgia Tech for the past 16 years,” Iliev says. “We are fortunate to have very bright and hardworking students, which makes teaching every class an enjoyable and rewarding experience.”

Daniel Richard Grayson

Contact Information

April 12, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

The William A. “gus” Baird Faculty Teaching Award

This award for Associate and Full Professors is named after "gus" Baird. He was known as gus with a small "g". He had many memorable sayings that his students called, "gus-isms".  Nominees should possess qualities that make them stand out just as "gus" Baird had.

  • Must have taught at least two courses for a minimum of six credits during the previous calendar year, with at least one being an undergraduate course.
  • An individual may receive this award not more than once every four years.
  • Award Amount: $500
  • Who is Eligible: Associate and Full Professors
  • Who Can Nominate: Faculty, Students, Staff

April 12, 2019 | Atlanta, GA

The William A. “gus” Baird Faculty Teaching Award

This award for Associate and Full Professors is named after "gus" Baird. He was known as gus with a small "g". He had many memorable sayings that his students called, "gus-isms".  Nominees should possess qualities that make them stand out just as "gus" Baird had.

  • Must have taught at least two courses for a minimum of six credits during the previous calendar year, with at least one being an undergraduate course.
  • An individual may receive this award not more than once every four years.
  • Award Amount: $500
  • Who is Eligible: Associate and Full Professors
  • Who Can Nominate: Faculty, Students, Staff

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