This Week's Seminars and Colloquia

The asymptotic dimension of big mapping class groups

Series
Geometry Topology Seminar
Time
Monday, January 25, 2021 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
ONLINE
Speaker
Yvon VerberneGeorgia Institute of Technology

Dan Margalit is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.<br />
https://zoom.us/j/94410378648?pwd=TVV6UDd0SnU3SnAveHA1NWxYcmlTdz09<br />
<br />
Meeting ID: 944 1037 8648<br />
Passcode: gojackets

In 2010, Bestvina-Bromberg-Fujiwara proved that the mapping class group of a finite type surface has finite asymptotic dimension. In contrast, we will show the mapping class group of an infinite-type surface has infinite asymptotic dimension if it contains an essential shift. This work is joint with Curtis Grant and Kasra Rafi.

Monte Carlo methods for the Hermitian eigenvaue problem

Series
Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar
Time
Monday, January 25, 2021 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
ONLINE https://bluejeans.com/884917410
Speaker
Robert WebberCourant Institute

In quantum mechanics and the analysis of Markov processes, Monte Carlo methods are needed to identify low-lying eigenfunctions of dynamical generators. The standard Monte Carlo approaches for identifying eigenfunctions, however, can be inaccurate or slow to converge. What limits the efficiency of the currently available spectral estimation methods and what is needed to build more efficient methods for the future? Through numerical analysis and computational examples, we begin to answer these questions. We present the first-ever convergence proof and error bounds for the variational approach to conformational dynamics (VAC), the dominant method for estimating eigenfunctions used in biochemistry. Additionally, we analyze and optimize variational Monte Carlo (VMC), which combines Monte Carlo with neural networks to accurately identify low-lying eigenstates of quantum systems.

Prague dimension of random graphs

Series
Graph Theory Seminar
Time
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 15:45 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/77238664391. For password, please email Anton Bernshteyn (bahtoh ~at~ gatech.edu)
Speaker
He GuoGeorgia Institute of Technology

The Prague dimension of graphs was introduced by Nešetřil, Pultr and Rödl in the 1970s. Proving a conjecture of Füredi and Kantor, we show that the Prague dimension of the binomial random graph is typically of order $n/\log n$ for constant edge-probabilities. The main new proof ingredient is a Pippenger–Spencer type edge-coloring result for random hypergraphs with large uniformities, i.e., edges of size $O(\log n)$. Based on joint work with Kalen Patton and Lutz Warnke.

A Polynomial Roth Theorem for Corners in the Finite Field Setting

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09
Speaker
Michael LaceyGeorgia Tech

An initial result of Bourgain and Chang has lead to a number of striking advances in the understanding of polynomial extensions of Roth's Theorem.
The most striking of these is the result of Peluse and Prendiville which show that sets in [1 ,..., N] with density greater than (\log N)^{-c} contain polynomial progressions of length k (where c=c(k)).  There is as of yet no corresponding result for corners, the two dimensional setting for Roth's Theorem, where one would seek progressions of the form(x,y), (x+t^2, y), (x,y+t^3) in  [1 ,..., N]^2, for example.  

Recently, the corners version of the result of Bourgain and Chang has been established, showing an effective bound for a three term polynomial Roth theorem in the finite field setting.  We will survey this area. Joint work with Rui Han and Fan Yang.

The link for the seminar is the following

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09

Serre Spectral Sequence

Series
Geometry Topology Student Seminar
Time
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 14:00 for
Location
ONLINE
Speaker
Hugo Zhou

I will introduce Serre spectral sequences, then compute some examples. The talk will be in most part following Allen Hatcher's notes on spectral sequences.

Representations of Sl(2,C) in combinatorics

Series
Student Algebraic Geometry Seminar
Time
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 09:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Microsoft Teams
Speaker
Trevor GunnGeorgia Tech

There are two purposes of this talk: 1. to give an example of representation theory in algebraic combinatorics and 2. to explain some of the early work on unimodal/symmetric sequences in combinatorics related to recent work on Hodge theory in combinatorics. We will investigate the structure of graded vector spaces $\bigoplus V_j$ with two "shifting" operators $V_j \to V_{j+1}$ and $V_j → V_{j-1}$. We will see that this leads to a very rich theory of unimodal and symmetric sequences with several interesting connections (e.g. the Edge-Reconstruction Conjecture and Hard Lefschetz). The majority of this talk should be accessible to anyone with a solid knowledge of linear algebra.

https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3a3a9d7f9d1fca4f5b991b4029b09c69a1%40thread.tacv2/1611606555671

The differential equation method in Banach spaces and the n-queens problem

Series
Combinatorics Seminar
Time
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://bluejeans.com/751242993/PASSWORD (To receive the password, please email Lutz Warnke
Speaker
Michael Simkin

The differential equation method is a powerful tool used to study the evolution of random combinatorial processes. By showing that the process is likely to follow the trajectory of an ODE, one can study the deterministic ODE rather than the random process directly. We extend this method to ODEs in infinite-dimensional Banach spaces.
We apply this tool to the classical n-queens problem: Let Q(n) be the number of placements of n non-attacking chess queens on an n x n board. Consider the following random process: Begin with an empty board. For as long as possible choose, uniformly at random, a space with no queens in its row, column, or either diagonal, and place on it a queen. We associate the process with an abstract ODE. By analyzing the ODE we conclude that the process almost succeeds in placing n queens on the board. Furthermore, we can obtain a complete n-queens placement by making only a few changes to the board. By counting the number of choices available at each step we conclude that Q(n) \geq (n/C)^n, for a constant C>0 associated with the ODE. This is optimal up to the value of C.

Based on joint work with Zur Luria.