Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , JungHwan Park , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Prasad Tetali , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Federico Bonetto , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Haomin Zhou , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 00:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Thang Le , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 00:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Yoav Len , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Wednesday, October 3, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Justin Lanier , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
After briefly describing my research interests, I’ll speak on two results that involve points moving around on surfaces. The first result shows how to “hear the shape of a billiard table.” A point bouncing around a polygon encodes a sequence of edges. We show how to recover geometric information about the table from the collection of all such bounce sequences. This is joint work with Calderon, Coles, Davis, and Oliveira. The second result answers the question, “Given n distinct points in a closed ball, when can a new point be added in a continuous fashion?” We answer this question for all values of n and for all dimensions. Our results generalize the Brouwer fixed point theorem, which gives a negative answer when n=1. This is joint work with Chen and Gadish.
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Igor Pak , University of California, Los Angeles , pak@ucla.edu , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Integer sequences arise in a large variety of combinatorial problems as a way to count combinatorial objects.  Some of them have nice formulas, some have elegant recurrences, and some have nothing interesting about them at all.  Can we characterize when?  Can we even formalize what is a "formula"?  I will try to answer these questions by presenting many examples, results and open problems. Note:  This is an introductory general audience talk unrelated to the colloquium.
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Blair Sullivan , North Carolina State University , blair_sullivan@ncsu.edu , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
In this talk, we describe transforming a theoretical algorithm from structural graph theory into open-source software being actively used for real-world data analysis in computational biology. Specifically, we apply the r-dominating set algorithm for graph classes of bounded expansion in the setting of metagenome analysis. We discuss algorithmic improvements required for a practical implementation, alongside exciting preliminary biological results (on real data!). Finally, we include a brief retrospective on the collaboration process. No prior knowledge in metagenomics or structural graph theory is assumed. Based on joint work with T. Brown, D. Moritz, M. O’Brien, F. Reidl and T. Reiter.
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 - 12:20 , Location: Skiles 005 , Michael Damron , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Trevor Gunn
Random and irregular growth is all around us. We see it in the form of cancer growth, bacterial infection, fluid flow through porous rock, and propagating flame fronts. In this talk, I will introduce several different models for random growth and the different shapes that can arise from them. Then I will talk in more detail about one model, first-passage percolation, and some of the main questions that researchers study about it.

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