Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Introduction to Sheaf Theory

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, September 16, 2009 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 255
Speaker
John EtnyreGa Tech
In these talks we will introduced the basic definitions and examples of presheaves, sheaves and sheaf spaces. We will also explore various constructions and properties of these objects.

Math at Top Speed

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, September 14, 2009 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Student Services Building, Auditorium 117
Speaker
Richard TapiaRice University
In this talk Professor Tapia identifies elementary mathematical frameworks for the study of popular drag racing beliefs. In this manner some myths are validated while others are destroyed. Tapia will explain why dragster acceleration is greater than the acceleration due to gravity, an age old inconsistency. His "Fundamental Theorem of Drag Racing" will be presented. The first part of the talk will be a historical account of the development of drag racing and will include several lively videos.

Introduction to Sheaf Theory

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, September 9, 2009 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
John EtnyreGa Tech
In these talks we will introduced the basic definitions and examples of presheaves, sheaves and sheaf spaces. We will also explore various constructions and properties of these objects.

Introduction to Sheaf Theory

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, September 2, 2009 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 255
Speaker
John EtnyreGa Tech
In these talks we will introduced the basic definitions and examples of presheaves, sheaves and sheaf spaces. We will also explore various constructions and properties of these objects.

Brown bag seminar on mathematical challenges in astrophysics

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 12:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 255
Speaker
Pablo LagunaSchool of Physics, Georgia Tech
This will be an informal seminar with a discussion on some mathematical problems in relativistic astrophysics, and discuss plans for future joint seminars between the Schools of Mathematics and Physics.

On the sum-product problem

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 16:30 for 2 hours
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
Jozsef SolymosiMath, UBC
An old conjecture of Erdos and Szemeredi states that if A is a finite set of integers then the sum-set or the product-set should be large. The sum-set of A is A + A={a+b | a,b \in A\}, and the product set is defined in a similar way, A*A={ab | a,b \in A}. Erdos and Szemeredi conjectured that the sum-set or the product set is almost quadratic in |A|, i.e. max(|A+A|,|A*A|)> c|A|^{2-\epsilon}. In this talk we review some recent developments and problems related to the conjecture.

Twistor Theory, Then and Now

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Howey Physics Lecture Room 5
Speaker
Roger PenroseMathematical Institute, University of Oxford
Twistor theory is now over 45 years old. In December 1963, I proposed the initial ideas of this scheme, based on complex-number geometry, which presents an alternative perspective to that of standard 4-dimensional space-time, for the basic arena in which (quantum) physics takes place. Over the succeeding years, there were numerous intriguing developments. But many of these were primarily mathematical, and there was little interest expressed by the physics community. Things changed rather dramatically, in December 2003, when E. Witten produced a 99-page article initiating the subject of “twistor-string theory” this providing a novel approach to high-energy scattering processes. In this talk, I shall provide an account of the original geometrical and physical ideas, and also outline various recent developments, some of which may help our understandings of the seeming paradoxes of quantum mechanics.

Aeons Before the Big Bang?

Series
Other Talks
Time
Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 17:30 for 2 hours
Location
LeCraw Auditorium, Room 100
Speaker
Roger PenroseMathematical Institute, University of Oxford
There is much impressive observational evidence, mainly from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), for an enormously hot and dense early stage of the universe --- referred to as the Big Bang. Observations of the CMB are now very detailed, but this very detail presents new puzzles of various kinds, one of the most blatant being an apparent paradox in relation to the second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesis of inflationary cosmology has long been argued to explain away some of these puzzles, but it does not resolve some key issues, including that raised by the second law. In this talk, I describe a quite different proposal, which posits a succession of universe aeons prior to our own. The expansion of the universe never reverses in this scheme, but the space-time geometry is nevertheless made consistent through a novel geometrical conception. Some very recent analysis of the CMB data, obtained with the WMAP satellite, will be described, this having a profound but tantalizing bearing on these issues.

Introduction to metric and comparison geometry

Series
Other Talks
Time
Friday, February 27, 2009 - 15:00 for 2 hours
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
Igor BelegradekSchool of Mathematics, Georgia Tech
Comparison geometry studies Riemannian manifolds with a given curvature bound. This minicourse is an introduction to volume comparison (as developed by Bishop and Gromov), which is fundamental in understanding manifolds with a lower bound on Ricci curvature. Prerequisites are very modest: we only need basics of Riemannian geometry, and fluency with fundamental groups and metric spaces. In the third (2 hour) lecture I shall prove volume and Laplacian comparison theorems.

Introduction to metric and comparison geometry

Series
Other Talks
Time
Friday, February 20, 2009 - 15:00 for 2 hours
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
Igor BelegradekSchool of Mathematics, Georgia Tech
Comparison geometry studies Riemannian manifolds with a given curvature bound. This minicourse is an introduction to volume comparison (as developed by Bishop and Gromov), which is fundamental in understanding manifolds with a lower bound on Ricci curvature. Prerequisites are very modest: we only need basics of Riemannian geometry, and fluency with fundamental groups and metric spaces. The second (2 hour) lecture is about Gromov-Hausdorff convergence, which provides a natural framework to studying degenerations of Riemannian metrics.

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