Seminars and Colloquia by Series

TBA Bobby Wilson

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, November 10, 2020 - 02:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09
Speaker
Bobby WilsonUniversity of Washington

Two results on the interaction energy

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09
Speaker
Yao YaoGeorgia Tech


For any nonnegative density f and radially decreasing interaction potential W, the celebrated Riesz rearrangement inequality shows the interaction energy E[f] = \int f(x)f(y)W(x-y) dxdy satisfies E[f] <= E[f^*], where f^* is the radially decreasing rearrangement of f. It is a natural question to look for a quantitative version of this inequality: if its two sides almost agree, how close must f be to a translation of f^*? Previously the stability estimate was only known for characteristic functions. I will discuss a recent work with Xukai Yan, where we found a simple proof of stability estimates for general densities. 

I will also discuss another work with Matias Delgadino and Xukai Yan, where we constructed an interpolation curve between any two radially decreasing densities with the same mass, and show that the interaction energy is convex along this interpolation. As an application, this leads to uniqueness of steady states in aggregation-diffusion equations with any attractive interaction potential for diffusion power m>=2, where the threshold is sharp.

Quantitative stability for minimizing Yamabe metrics

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09
Speaker
Robin NeumayerNorthwestern University

The Yamabe problem asks whether, given a closed Riemannian manifold, one can find a conformal metric of constant scalar curvature (CSC). An affirmative answer was given by Schoen in 1984, following contributions from Yamabe, Trudinger, and Aubin, by establishing the existence of a function that minimizes the so-called Yamabe energy functional; the minimizing function corresponds to the conformal factor of the CSC metric.

We address the quantitative stability of minimizing Yamabe metrics. On any closed Riemannian manifold we show—in a quantitative sense—that if a function nearly minimizes the Yamabe energy, then the corresponding conformal metric is close to a CSC metric. Generically, this closeness is controlled quadratically by the Yamabe energy deficit. However, we construct an example demonstrating that this quadratic estimate is false in the general. This is joint work with Max Engelstein and Luca Spolaor.

An enhanced uncertainty principle

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, October 6, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/71579248210?pwd=d2VPck1CbjltZStURWRWUUgwTFVLZz09
Speaker
Joaquim Ortega-CerdaUniversity of Barcelona

We improve on some recent results of Sagiv and Steinerberger that quantify the following uncertainty principle: for a function f with mean zero, then either the size of the zero set of the function or the cost of transporting the mass of the positive part of f to its negative part must be big. We also provide a sharp upper estimate of the transport cost of the positive part of an eigenfunction of the Laplacian.

This proves a conjecture of Steinerberger and provides a lower bound of the size of a nodal set of the eigenfunction. Finally, we use a similar technique to provide a measure of how well the points in a design in a manifold are equidistributed. This is a joint work with Tom Carroll and Xavier Massaneda.

Balian-Low theorems for subspaces

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
online seminar
Speaker
Andrei CarageaKatholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt
The Balian-Low theorem is a classical result in time-frequency analysis that describes a trade off between the basis properties of a Gabor system and the smoothness and decay of the Gabor window. 
In particular a Gabor system with well localized window cannot be a Riesz basis for the space of finite energy signals.
We explore a few generalizations of this fact in the setting of Riesz bases for subspaces of L^2 and we show that the Gabor space being invariant under additional time-frequency shifts is incompatible with two different notions of smoothness and decay for the Gabor window.

A different approach to endpoint weak-type estimates for Calderón-Zygmund operators

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87104893132
Speaker
Cody StockdaleClemson

The weak-type (1,1) estimate for Calderón-Zygmund operators is fundamental in harmonic analysis. We investigate weak-type inequalities for Calderón-Zygmund singular integral operators using the Calderón-Zygmund decomposition and ideas inspired by Nazarov, Treil, and Volberg. We discuss applications of these techniques in the Euclidean setting, in weighted settings, for multilinear operators, for operators with weakened smoothness assumptions, and in studying the dimensional dependence of the Riesz transforms.

Integral neural networks with weight penalization

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Tuesday, September 1, 2020 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87104893132
Speaker
Armenak PetrosyanGeorgia Tech

Artificial neural networks have gained widespread adoption as a powerful tool for various machine learning tasks in recent years. Training a neural network to approximate a target function involves solving an inherently non-convex problem. In practice, this is done using stochastic gradient descent with random initialization. For the approximation problem with neural networks error rate guarantees are established for different classes of functions however these rates are not always achieved in practice due to many  local minima of the resulting optimization problem. 

The challenge we address in this work is the following. We want to find small size shallow neural networks that can be trained algorithmically and which achieve guaranteed approximation speed and precision. To maintain the small size we apply penalties on the weights of the network. We show that under minimal requirements, all local minima of the resulting problem are well behaved and possess a desirable small size without sacrificing precision. We adopt the integral neural network framework and use techniques from optimization theory and harmonic analysis to prove our results. In this talk, we will discuss our existing work and possible future promising areas of interest where this approach can potentially be adopted. 

Cancelled

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 - 13:55 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 005
Speaker

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