Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Preparing Teachers for the New Generation of K-16 Students - Letting Go of the Reliance upon the Traditional Statistics Introductory Course

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, March 8, 2010 - 11:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Room 129, Global Learning Center (behind the GA Tech Hotel)
Speaker
Christine FranklinUniversity of Georgia

Please Note: For more information, see the flyer.

Statistics is now a part of the K-12 curriculum (including elementary school) and there is much activity in the area of statistics education. This colloquium is intended for any and all faculty, staff, and students, who are interested in, have taught, or have children in k-12 schools.

Mathemagics - the art of mental calculation

Series
Other Talks
Time
Saturday, March 6, 2010 - 19:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Instructional Center Room 103
Speaker
Art BenjaminHarvey Mudd College
The speaker has combined his two loves to create a dynamic presentation called "Mathemagics," suitable for all audiences, where he demonstrates and explains his secrets for performing rapid mental calculations faster than a calculator. Reader's Digest calls him "America's Best Math Whiz". He has presented his high energy talk for thousands of groups throughout the world. This event is free but reservations are required. The signup form will be available before 5pm on February 25. See details about the speaker.

Southeast SIAM Student Conference

Series
Other Talks
Time
Saturday, March 6, 2010 - 09:00 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
SIAM Student ConferenceSchool of Mathematics, Georgia Tech
The SIAM Student Chapter at Georgia Tech will be hosting this conference. It is an extension of the ACES Workshop which has been held yearly by the universities of Auburn, Clemson, Emory, and South Carolina since 2006. As with the ACES Workshop, this conference is an opportunity for graduate students to present their research in applied mathematics and related fields as well as to meet with other graduate students from different universities and departments. See the conference site for more details.

How to Partition a Mixed Phase Space - with Applications to Atomic Physics

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, March 1, 2010 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Howey N110
Speaker
Kevin MitchellUniversity of California, Merced
Hamiltonian systems typically exhibit a mixture of chaos and regularity, complicating any scheme to partition phase space and extract a symbolic description of the dynamics. In particular, the dynamics in the vicinity of stable islands can exhibit extremely complicated topology. We present an approach to extracting symbolic dynamics in such systems using networks of nested heteroclinic tangles-- fundamental geometric objects that organize phase space transport. These tangles can be used to progressively approximate the behavior in the vicinity of stable island chains. The net result is a symbolic approximation to the dynamics, and an associated phase-space partition, that includes the influence of stable islands. The utility of this approach is illustrated by examining two applications in atomic physics -- the chaotic escape of ultracold atoms from an atomic trap and the chaotic ionization of atoms in external fields.

Club Math - Mathematics of the Lottery

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, February 24, 2010 - 16:30 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 269
Speaker
Skip GaribaldiDepartment of Mathematics and Computer Science
Dr. Skip Garibaldi, Emory University's Winship Distinguished Professor, will make a presentation on Mathematics of the Lottery. He will discuss his expository article: "Finding good bets in the lottery, and why you shouldn't take them" recently published in the American Mathematical Monthly, Volume 117 (2010) 3-26.

Georgia Scientific Computing Symposium

Series
Other Talks
Time
Saturday, February 20, 2010 - 09:00 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Skiles 249
Speaker
Georgia Scientific Computing SymposiumSchool of Mathematics, Georgia Tech
The purpose of the Georgia Scientific Computing Symposium (GSC 2010) is to provide an opportunity for professors, postdocs and graduate students in the Atlanta area to meet in an informal setting, to exchange ideas, and to highlight local scientific computing research. The one-day symposium is open to the whole research community. The event is free but registration is required.

ARC Colloquium - Saving Space by Algebraization

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 10:03 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Klaus 1116W
Speaker
Daniel LokshtanovInstitutt for Informatikk, Universitetet i Bergen
The Subset Sum and Knapsack problems are fundamental NP-complete problems and the pseudo-polynomial time dynamic programming algorithms for them appear in every algorithms textbook. The algorithms require pseudo-polynomial time and space. Since we do not expect polynomial time algorithms for Subset Sum and Knapsack to exist, a very natural question is whether they can be solved in pseudo-polynomial time and polynomial space. In this paper we answer this question affrmatively, and give the first pseudo-polynomial time, polynomial space algorithms for these problems. Our approach is based on algebraic methods and turns out to be useful for several other problems as well. If there is time i will also show how our method can be applied to give polynomial space exact algorithms for the classical Traveling Salesman, Weighted Set Cover and Weighted Steiner Tree problems. Joint work with Jesper Nederlof.

Message Passing Networks

Series
Other Talks
Time
Friday, February 5, 2010 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Klaus 1116E
Speaker
Jinwoo ShinMassachusetts Institute of Technology

Please Note: Refreshments in Room 2222, Klaus Building from 2-3 PM.

Simple, distributed and iterative algorithms, popularly known as the message passing algorithms, have emerged as the architecture of choice for engineered networks as well as cannonical behavioral model for societal and biological networks. Despite their simplicity, message passing algorithms have been surprisingly effective. In this talk, I will try to argue in favor of such algorithms by means of two results in the context of designing efficient medium access in wireless networks and modeling agent behavior in road transportation networks. See the full abstract,

Pages