Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Quolloquium: Spectral geometry of quantum waveguides

Series
Other Talks
Time
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 255
Speaker
David KrejcirikCzech Technical University

Please Note: NOTE: This is the first in a forthcoming series of colloquia in quantum mathematical physics that will take place this semester. The series is a spin-off of last year's QMath conference, and is intended to be of broad interest to people wanting to know the state of the art of current topics in mathematical physics.

We shall make an overview of the interplay between the geometry of tubular neighbourhoods of Riemannian manifold and the spectrum of the associated Dirichlet Laplacian. An emphasis will be put on the existence of curvature-induced eigenvalues in bent tubes and Hardy-type inequalities in twisted tubes of non-circular cross-section. Consequences of the results for physical systems modelled by the Schroedinger or heat equations will be discussed.

Beginning of the Year Meeting

Series
Other Talks
Time
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 11:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles Atrium
Speaker
Rachel KuskeGeorgia Tech
Introduction of the new Faculty, Postdocs, Academic Professionals and Staff.

SIAM Conference on Applied Algebraic Geometry

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, July 31, 2017 - 09:00 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Clough 152 (plenary talks), Skiles (parallel sessions)
Speaker
SIAM AG 2017Georgia Tech
Georgia Tech is the site of the 2017 SIAM Conference on Applied Algebraic Geometry (July 31 to August 4). This biennial meeting is an activity of the Activity Group in Applied Geometry of SIAM, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The SIAM Activity Group in Algebraic Geometry aims to bring together researchers who use algebraic geometry in industrial and applied mathematics. "Algebraic geometry" is interpreted broadly to include at least algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, noncommutative algebra, symbolic and numeric computation, algebraic and geometric combinatorics, representation theory, and algebraic topology. These methods have already seen applications in biology, coding theory, cryptography, combustion, computational geometry, computer graphics, quantum computing, control theory, geometric design, complexity theory, machine learning, nonlinear partial differential equations, optimization, robotics, and statistics. School of Mathematics professors Greg Blekherman, Anton Leykin, and Josephine Yu lead the local organizing committee.

Applied Macaulay2 Tutorials

Series
Other Talks
Time
Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 09:00 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Skiles 005 and 006
Speaker
Macaulay2Georgia Tech
Dates: July 27-29 (Thu-Sat). Schedule will appear here. These tutorials are intended to appeal to participants with any level of prior M2 experience. The topics will range from the basic functionality of M2 to modeling problems in the M2 language to more specialized tutorials on algebraic statistics and numerical algebraic geometry. We will also reserve ample time for practice and Q&A sessions. Registration is free, but please fill the form here.

Parallel Connections of Bilinear Systems

Series
Other Talks
Time
Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 11:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
TSRB 132
Speaker
Guenther Dirr University of Wuzburg
First, we present a necessary and sufficient conditions for accessibility of bilinear systems evolving on semisimple (matrix) Lie groups. From this, we derive a controllability criterion for parallel connections of bilinear systems which gets a if-and-only-if condition in the case of compact Lie groups. Finally, we present a key application from quantum control.

Opening meeting for the Stability and Transitions in Physical Processes (TraX)

Series
Other Talks
Time
Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 08:03 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Skiles 005
Speaker
Several speakers 8 Institutions.
The TraX project is an inter-university effort, involving researchers from 8 universities, aimed at elucidating the geometric structures in phase space which determine the speed and nature of chemical reactions and how they are affected by external influences such as light pulses or noise. The effort is highly interdisciplinary and it involves Mathematics (Dynamical Systems), Numerical Computations, Physics, and Chemistry all working together to understand experimental phenomena and make predictions. The project has been funded by the European Research Council, Mathematics Division for 4 years and it will sponsor visits of European scientists to GT and provide opportunities for graduate students to collaborate in this area. http://traxkickoff.gatech.edu/

Polyrhythms everywhere!

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, April 10, 2017 - 19:00 for 1.5 hours (actually 80 minutes)
Location
Bill Moore Student Sucess Center - Cleary Theatre
Speaker
Tom MorleyGeorgia Institute of Technology
Rhythm is a great thing. It therefore follows that several rhythms at once is even greater. Learn 2:3, 3:4, and 4:5, and a little bit about fractions. Polyrhythms when sped up, lead to harmony and scales. Slower polyrhythms happen in celestial mechanics. A little bit of music, a little bit of mathematics.

Southeast Geometry Seminar

Series
Other Talks
Time
Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 08:55 for 8 hours (full day)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
six speakers on topics in geometryfrom various universities
Mozghan Entekhabi (Wichita State University) Radial Limits of Bounded Nonparametric Prescribed Mean Curvature Surfaces ; Miyuki Koiso (Kyushu University) Stability and bifurcation for surfaces with constant mean curvature ; Vladimir Oliker (Emory University) Freeform lenses, Jacobian equations, and supporting quadric method(SQM) ; Sungho Park (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies) Circle-foliated minimal and CMC surfaces in S^3 ; Yuanzhen Shao (Purdue University) Degenerate and singular elliptic operators on manifolds with singularities ; Ray Treinen (Texas State University) Surprising non-uniqueness for the 2D floating ball ; See http://www.math.uab.edu/sgs/ for abstracts and further details.

Tour & Endgame Trajectory Design Using Dynamical Systems Theory

Series
Other Talks
Time
Monday, February 20, 2017 - 15:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Guggenheim Building Room 442
Speaker
Rodney L. AndersonJet Propulsion Lab.
New and proposed interplanetary missions increasingly require the design of trajectories within challenging multi-body environments that stress or exceed the capabilities of the two-body design methodologies typically used over the last several decades. These current methods encounter difficulties because they often require appreciable user interaction, result in trajectories that require significant amounts of propellant, or miss potential mission-enabling options. The use of dynamical systems methods applied to three-body and multi-body models provides a pathway to obtain a fuller theoretical understanding of the problem that can then result in significant improvements to trajectory design in each of these areas. In particular, the computation of periodic Lagrange point and resonant orbits along with their associated invariant manifolds and heteroclinic connections are crucial to finding the dynamical channels that provide new or more optimal solutions. These methods are particularly effective for mission types that include multi-body tours, Earth-Moon transfers, approaches to moons, and trajectories to asteroids. The inclusion of multi-body effects early in the analysis for these applications is key to providing a more complete set of solutions that includes improved trajectories that may otherwise be missed when using two-body methods. This seminar will focus on two representative trajectory design applications that are especially challenging. The first is the design of tours using flybys of planets or moons with a particular emphasis on the Galilean moons and Europa. In this case, the exploration of the design space using the invariant manifolds of resonant and Lyapunov orbits provides information such as the resonance transitions that are required as part of the tour. The second application includes endgame scenarios, which typically involve an approach to a moon with an objective of either capturing into orbit around the moon or landing on the surface. Often, the invariant manifolds of particular orbits may be used in this case to provide a wide set of approach options for both capture and landing analyses. New methods will also be discussed that provide a foundation for rigorously analyzing the transit of trajectories through the libration point regions that is necessary for the approach and capture phase for bodies such as Europa and the Moon. These methods provide a fundamentally new method to search for the invariant manifolds of orbits and hyperbolic invariant sets associated with libration points while giving additional insight into the dynamics of the flow in these regions.

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