Seminars and Colloquia by Series

The intertwined derivative Schrödinger system of Calogero--Moser--Sutherland type

Series
Math Physics Seminar
Time
Wednesday, April 10, 2024 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Ruoci SunSchool of Mathematics, Georgia Tech

Please Note: Available via zoom at: https://gatech.zoom.us/j/98258240051

This presentation is dedicated to extending both defocusing and focusing Calogero–Moser–Sutherland derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations (CMSdNLS), which are introduced in Abanov–Bettelheim–Wiegmann [arXiv:0810.5327], Gérard-Lenzmann [arXiv:2208.04105] and R. Badreddine [arXiv:2303.01087, arXiv:2307.01592], to a system of two matrix-valued variables. This new system is an integrable extension and perturbation of the original CMSdNLS equations. Thanks to the conjugation acting method, I can establish the explicit expression for general solutions on the torus and on the real line in my work [hal-04227081].

On tight $(k, \ell)$-stable graphs

Series
Graph Theory Seminar
Time
Tuesday, April 9, 2024 - 15:30 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Zixia SongUniversity of Central Florida

For integers $k>\ell\ge0$, a graph $G$ is $(k,\ell)$-stable if  $\alpha(G-S)\geq \alpha(G)-\ell$ for every    
$S\subseteq V(G)$ with $|S|=k$. A recent result of Dong and Wu [SIAM J.
Discrete Math. 36 (2022) 229--240] shows that every $(k,\ell)$-stable 
graph $G$  satisfies $\alpha(G) \le  \lfloor ({|V(G)|-k+1})/{2}\rfloor+\ell$.  A $(k,\ell)$-stable graph $G$   is   tight if $\alpha(G) = \lfloor ({|V(G)|-k+1})/{2}\rfloor+\ell$; and  $q$-tight for some integer $q\ge0$ if $\alpha(G) = \lfloor ({|V(G)|-k+1})/{2}\rfloor+\ell-q$.
In this talk, we first prove  that for all $k\geq 24$, the only tight $(k, 0)$-stable graphs are $K_{k+1}$ and  $K_{k+2}$, answering a question of Dong and Luo [arXiv: 2401.16639]. We then prove that  for all nonnegative integers $k, \ell, q$ with $k\geq 3\ell+3$, every $q$-tight $(k,\ell)$-stable graph has at most  $k-3\ell-3+2^{3(\ell+2q+4)^2}$ vertices, answering a question of Dong and Luo in the negative.   \\  

This is joint work with Xiaonan Liu and Zhiyu Wang. 

Self-similar singular solutions in gas dynamics

Series
PDE Seminar
Time
Tuesday, April 9, 2024 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 005
Speaker
Juhi JangUniversity of Southern California

In this talk, we will discuss mathematical construction of self-similar solutions exhibiting implosion arising in gas dynamics and gaseous stars, with focus on self-similar converging-diverging shock wave solutions to the non-isentropic Euler equations and imploding solutions to the Euler-Poisson equations describing gravitational collapse. The talk is based on joint works with Guo, Hadzic, Liu and Schrecker. 

Diffusion Models: Theory and Applications (in PDEs)

Series
Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar
Time
Monday, April 8, 2024 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 005 and https://gatech.zoom.us/j/98355006347
Speaker
Yulong LuUniversity of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Diffusion models, particularly score-based generative models (SGMs), have emerged as powerful tools in diverse machine learning applications, spanning from computer vision to modern language processing. In the first part of this talk, we delve into the generalization theory of SGMs, exploring their capacity for learning high-dimensional distributions. Our analysis show that SGMs achieve a dimension-free generation error bound when applied to a class of sub-Gaussian distributions characterized by certain low-complexity structures.  In the second part of the talk, we consider the application of diffusion models in solving partial differential equations (PDEs). Specifically, we present the development of a physics-guided diffusion model designed for reconstructing high-fidelity solutions from their low-fidelity counterparts. This application showcases the adaptability of diffusion models and their potential to scientific computation.  

Identifiability of overcomplete independent component analysis

Series
Algebra Seminar
Time
Monday, April 8, 2024 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 005
Speaker
Ada WangHarvard University

Please Note: There will be a pre-seminar in Skiles 005 at 11 am.

Independent component analysis (ICA) is a classical data analysis method to study mixtures of independent sources. An ICA model is said to be identifiable if the mixing can be recovered uniquely. Identifiability is known to hold if and only if at most one of the sources is Gaussian, provided the number of sources is at most the number of observations. In this talk, I will discuss our work to generalize the identifiability of ICA to the overcomplete setting, where the number of sources can exceed the number of observations.The underlying problem is algebraic and the proof studies linear spaces of rank one symmetric matrices. Based on joint work with Anna Seigal https://arxiv.org/abs/2401.14709

Measuring combinatorial complexity via regularity lemmas

Series
Time
Friday, April 5, 2024 - 16:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Lecture Auditorium 1443, Klaus Building
Speaker
Caroline TerryOhio State University

Atlanta Combinatorics Colloquium Hosted by Georgia Tech

Abstract: Many tools have been developed in combinatorics to study global structure in finite graphs. One such tool is called Szemerédi's regularity lemma, which gives a structural decomposition for any large finite graph. Beginning with work of Alon–Fischer–Newman, Lovász–Szegedy, and Malliaris–Shelah, it has been shown over the last 15 years that regularity lemmas can be used to detect structural dichotomies in graphs, and that these dichotomies have deep connections to model theory. In this talk, I present extensions of this type of result to arithmetic regularity lemmas, which are analogues of graph regularity lemmas, tailored to the study of combinatorial problems in finite groups. This work uncovered tight connections between tools from additive combinatorics, and ideas from the model theoretic study of infinite groups.

Riemannian geometry and contact topology III

Series
Geometry Topology Working Seminar
Time
Friday, April 5, 2024 - 14:00 for 2 hours
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
John EtnyreGeorgia Tech

This series of talks will discuss connections between Riemannian geometry and contact topology. Both structures have deep connections to the topology of 3-manifolds, but there has been little study of the interactions between them (at least the implications in contact topology). We will see that there are interesting connections between curvature and properties of contact structures. The talks will give a brief review of both Riemannian geometry and contact topology and then discuss various was one might try to connect them. There will be many open problems discussed (probably later in the series). 

Geometry, topology, and combinatorics of fine curve graph variants

Series
Dissertation Defense
Time
Friday, April 5, 2024 - 13:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 169
Speaker
Roberta ShapiroGeorgia Tech

The goal of this talk is to explore curve graphs, which are combinatorial tools that encode topological information about surfaces. We focus on variants of the fine curve graph of a surface. The fine curve graph has its vertices essential simple closed curves on the surface and its edges connect pairs of curves that are disjoint. We will mention a sampling of related theorems which were proven in collaboration with various coauthors and then prove several results regarding the finitary curve graph, which has as its vertices essential simple closed curves while its edges connect pairs of curves that intersect at finitely many points.

In this talk, we will prove that the finitary curve graph has diameter 2 (geometry), that the flag complex induced by the finitary curve graph is contractible (topology), and that the automorphism group of the finitary curve graph is naturally isomorphic to the homeomorphism group of the surface (combinatorics).

Work mentioned in the talk will be a subset of independent work and of collaborations with Katherine Booth, Ryan Dickmann, Dan Minahan, and Alex Nolte. The talk will be aimed at a non-expert audience.

Local vs Non-Local Poincar\'e Inequalities and Quantitative Exponential Concentration

Series
Stochastics Seminar
Time
Thursday, April 4, 2024 - 15:30 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Christian HoudréGeorgia Institute of Technology

Weighted Poincar\'e inequalities known for various laws such as the exponential or Cauchy ones are shown to follow from the "usual"  Poincar\'e inequality involving the non-local gradient.  A key ingredient in showing so is a covariance representation and Hardy's inequality.  

The framework under study is quite general and comprises infinitely divisible laws as well as some log-concave ones.  This same covariance representation is then used to obtain quantitative concentration inequalities of exponential type, recovering in particular the Gaussian results.  

Joint Work with Benjamin Arras.  

On the Curved Trilinear Hilbert Transform

Series
Analysis Seminar
Time
Wednesday, April 3, 2024 - 14:00 for 1 hour (actually 50 minutes)
Location
Skiles 006
Speaker
Bingyang HuAuburn University

The goal of this talk is to discuss the Lp boundedness of the trilinear Hilbert transform along the moment curve. We show that it is bounded in the Banach range.  

The main difficulty in approaching this problem(compared to the classical approach to the bilinear Hilbert transform) is the lack of absolute summability after we apply the time-frequency discretization(which is known as the LGC-methodology introduced by V. Lie in 2019). To overcome such a difficulty, we develop a new, versatile approch -- referred to as Rank II LGC (which is also motived by the study of the non-resonant bilinear Hilbert-Carleson operator by C. Benea, F. Bernicot, V. Lie, and V. Vitturi in 2022), whose control is achieved via the following interdependent elements:

1). a sparse-uniform deomposition of the input functions adapted to an appropriate time-frequency foliation of the phase-space;

2). a structural analysis of suitable maximal "joint Fourier coefficients";

3). a level set analysis with respect to the time-frequency correlation set. 

This is a joint work with my postdoc advisor Victor Lie from Purdue.

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